The Dog and the Hare

The Dog and the Hare
Moral: No one can be a friend if you know not whether to trust or distrust him. A Hound having started a Hare on the hillside pursued her for some distance, at one time biting her with his teeth as…

The Thief and the Innkeeper

The Thief and the Innkeeper
Moral: Every tale is not to be believed. A Thief hired a room in a tavern and stayed a while in the hope of stealing something which should enable him to pay his reckoning. When he had waited some days…

The Crow and the Pitcher

The Crow and the Pitcher
Moral: Necessity is the mother of invention. A Crow perishing with thirst saw a pitcher, and hoping to find water, flew to it with delight. When he reached it, he discovered to his grief that it contained so little water…

The Stag, the Wolf, and the Sheep

The Stag, the Wolf, and the Sheep
Moral: Two blacks do not make one white. A Stag asked a Sheep to lend him a measure of wheat, and said that the Wolf would be his surety. The Sheep, fearing some fraud was intended, excused herself, saying, “The…

The Crow and the Raven

The Crow and the Raven
Moral: Those who assume a character which does not belong to them, only make themselves ridiculous. A Crow was jealous of the Raven, because he was considered a bird of good omen and always attracted the attention of men, who…

The Bowman and Lion

The Bowman and Lion
This entry is part 108 of 118 in the series Aesop's FablesMoral: Be on guard against men who can strike from a distance. A very skilful Bowman went to the mountains in search of game, but all the beasts …