The Fox And The Stork

This entry is part 19 of 84 in the series Aesop's Fables

At one time the Fox and the Stork were on visiting terms and seemed very good friends. So the Fox invited the stork to dinner, and for a joke put nothing before her but some soup in a very shallow dish.

This the Fox could easily lap up, but the Stork could only wet the end of her long bill in it, and left the meal as hungry as when she began. ‘I am sorry,’ said the Fox, ‘the soup is not to your liking.’

‘Pray do not apologize,’ said the Stork. ‘I hope you will return this visit, and come and dine with me soon.’ So a day was appointed when the Fox should visit the Stork; but when they were seated at table all that was for their dinner was contained in a very long-necked jar with a narrow mouth, in which the Fox could not insert his snout, so all he could manage to do was to lick the outside of the jar.

‘I will not apologize for the dinner,’ said the Stork: ‘One bad turn deserves another.’

The Fox And The Stork

Aesop

Aesop (c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

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