The Frog and the Ox

This entry is part 40 of 84 in the series Aesop's Fables

‘Oh Father,’ said a little Frog to the big one sitting by the side of a pool, ‘I have seen such a terrible monster! It was as big as a mountain, with horns on its head, and a long tail, and it had hoofs divided in two.’ ‘Tush, child, tush,’ said the old Frog, ‘that was only Farmer White’s Ox.

It isn’t so big either; he may be a little bit taller than I, but I could easily make myself quite as broad; just you see.’ So he blew himself out, and blew himself out, and blew himself out. ‘Was he as big as that?’ asked he.

‘Oh, much bigger than that,’ said the young Frog. Again the old one blew himself out, and asked the young one if the Ox was as big as that.

‘Bigger, father, bigger,’ was the reply. So the Frog took a deep breath, and blew and blew and blew, and swelled and swelled and swelled. And then he said: ‘I’m sure the Ox is not as big as..’ But at this moment he burst.

Self-conceit may lead to self-destruction.

The Frog and the Ox

Aesop

Aesop (c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

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