The Hart and the Hunter

This entry is part 80 of 84 in the series Aesop's Fables

The Hart was once drinking from a pool and admiring the noble figure he made there. ‘Ah,’ said he, ‘where can you see such noble horns as these, with such antlers!

I wish I had legs more worthy to bear such a noble crown; it is a pity they are so slim and slight.’ At that moment a Hunter approached and sent an arrow whistling after him.

Away bounded the Hart, and soon, by the aid of his nimble legs, was nearly out of sight of the Hunter; but not noticing where he was going, he passed under some trees with branches growing low down in which his antlers were caught, so that the Hunter had time to come up.

‘Alas! alas!’ cried the Hart: ‘We often despise what is most useful to us.’

The Hart and the Hunter

Aesop

Aesop (c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

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