The Hart in the Ox-Stall

This entry is part 24 of 84 in the series Aesop's Fables

A Hart hotly pursued by the hounds fled for refuge into an ox-stall, and buried itself in a truss of hay, leaving nothing to be seen but the tips of his horns. Soon after the Hunters came up and asked if any one had seen the Hart.

The stable boys, who had been resting after their dinner, looked round, but could see nothing, and the Hunters went away.

Shortly afterwards the master came in, and looking round, saw that something unusual had taken place. He pointed to the truss of hay and said: ‘What are those two curious things sticking out of the hay?’

And when the stable boys came to look they discovered the Hart, and soon made an end of him. He thus learnt that Nothing escapes the master’s eye.

The Hart in the Ox-Stall

Aesop

Aesop (c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *