The Laborer and the Nightingale

This entry is part 73 of 84 in the series Aesop's Fables

A Laborer lay listening to a Nightingale’s song throughout the summer night. So pleased was he with it that the next night he set a trap for it and captured it. “Now that I have caught thee,” he cried, “thou shalt always sing to me.” “We Nightingales never sing in a cage.” said the bird.

“Then I’ll eat thee.” said the Laborer. “I have always heard say that a nightingale on toast is dainty morsel.”

“Nay, kill me not,” said the Nightingale; “but let me free, and I’ll tell thee three things far better worth than my poor body.” The Laborer let him loose, and he flew up to a branch of a tree and said: “Never believe a captive’s promise; that’s one thing.

Then again: Keep what you have. And third piece of advice is: Sorrow not over what is lost forever.” Then the song-bird flew away.

The Laborer and the Nightingale

Aesop

Aesop (c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

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