The Man and the Satyr

This entry is part 71 of 84 in the series Aesop's Fables

A Man had lost his way in a wood one bitter winter’s night. As he was roaming about, a Satyr came up to him, and finding that he had lost his way, promised to give him a lodging for the night, and guide him out of the forest in the morning.

As he went along to the Satyr’s cell, the Man raised both his hands to his mouth and kept on blowing at them. ‘What do you do that for?’ said the Satyr.

‘My hands are numb with the cold,’ said the Man, ‘and my breath warms them.’

After this they arrived at the Satyr’s home, and soon the Satyr put a smoking dish of porridge before him. But when the Man raised his spoon to his mouth he began blowing upon it. ‘And what do you do that for?’ said the Satyr.

‘The porridge is too hot, and my breath will cool it.’ ‘Out you go,’ said the Satyr. ‘I will have nought to do
with a man who can blow hot and cold with the same breath.’

The Man and the Satyr

Aesop

Aesop (c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

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