The Man and the Wooden God

This entry is part 65 of 84 in the series Aesop's Fables

In the old days men used to worship stocks and stones and idols, and prayed to them to give them luck.

It happened that a Man had often prayed to a wooden idol he had received from his father, but his luck never seemed to change.

He prayed and he prayed, but still he remained as unlucky as ever. One day in the greatest rage he went to the Wooden God, and with one blow swept it down from its pedestal.

The idol broke in two, and what did he see? An immense number of coins flying all over the place.

The Man and the Wooden God

Aesop

Aesop (c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

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