The Old Man And Death

This entry is part 1 of 84 in the series Aesop's Fables

An old laborer, bent double with age and toil, was gathering sticks in a forest.

At last he grew so tired and hopeless that he threw down the bundle of sticks, and cried out: ‘I cannot bear this life any longer. Ah, I wish Death would only come and take me!’

As he spoke, Death, a grisly skeleton, appeared and said to him: ‘What wouldst thou, Mortal? I heard thee call me.’

‘Please, sir,’ replied the woodcutter, ‘would you kindly help me to lift this fagot of sticks on to my shoulder?’ We would often be sorry if our wishes were gratified.

The Old Man And Death

Aesop

Aesop (c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

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