The Oracle and the Atheist

That man his Maker can deceive, Is monstrous folly to believe. The labyrinthine mazes of the heart Are open to His eyes in every part.

Translate:
Arabic Arabic Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Simplified) Dutch Dutch English English French French German German Hindi Hindi Italian Italian Portuguese Portuguese Russian Russian Spanish Spanish


That man his Maker can deceive,
Is monstrous folly to believe.
The labyrinthine mazes of the heart
Are open to His eyes in every part.
Whatever one may do, or think, or feel,
From Him no darkness can the thing conceal.
A pagan once, of graceless heart and hollow,
Whose faith in gods, I’m apprehensive,
Was quite as real as expensive.
Consulted, at his shrine, the god Apollo.
“Is what I hold alive, or not?”
Said he,—a sparrow having brought,
Prepared to wring its neck, or let it fly,
As need might be, to give the god the lie.
Apollo saw the trick,
And answered quick,
“Dead or alive, show me your sparrow,
And cease to set for me a trap
Which can but cause yourself mishap.
I see afar, and far I shoot my arrow.”

 

The Oracle and the Atheist by Jean de La Fontaine Fables in Book 4

Jean de La Fontaine
Jean de La Fontaine (8 September 1621 – 13 April 1695) was a French fabulist and one of the most widely read French poets of the 17th century. He is known above all for his Fables, which provided a model for subsequent fabulists across Europe and numerous alternative versions in France, and in French regional languages.
Leave a Reply