The Two Pots

This entry is part 11 of 84 in the series Aesop's Fables

Two Pots had been left on the bank of a river, one of brass, and one of earthenware. When the tide rose they both floated off down the stream.

Now the earthenware pot tried its best to keep aloof from the brass one, which cried out: ‘Fear nothing, friend, I will not strike you.’ ‘But I may come in contact with you,’ said the other, ‘if I come too close; and whether I hit you, or you hit me, I shall suffer for it.’

The strong and the weak cannot keep company.

The Two Pots

Aesop

Aesop (c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day.

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